Reduce Your Security and Compliance Risks with IT Asset Inventory Management

About this webinar

Recorded: September 13, 2018

To minimize security and compliance risks, as well as reduce costs on under-utilized hardware and software, IT pros need to inventory all IT assets their organization has and track changes to them. If done manually, these tasks require hours of tedious work, so many organizations seek tools that streamline the process. 

Join Vijay Sharma as he shares hands-on information, including: 
• How to simplify regular Windows Server inventory 
• How to identify where your information assets are located 
• How to spot security risks such as inactive accounts and overexposed data 
• How asset management can help you achieve cost savings and avoid regulatory fines 

Hosted by
Vijay Sharma,
Systems Engineer

Exploring Windows Server’s Data Classification Infrastructure to Find Private Data and Comply with GDPR, et al

In this real training for free event, we are going to dive into the File Classification Infrastructure (FCI) which first appeared in Windows Server 2008 R2 and continues to be enhanced in later versions of Windows.

With FCI you can set up rules that automatically classify files based on various factors, such as location, or content such as simple strings or regular expressions. FCI uses Windows Search to crawl your file servers and automatically classify the files based on the classification properties and rules you set up. Once files have been classified, FCI can perform specified actions on them, such as moving them to a specified directory or encrypting them.

FCI adds classification metadata to files using the NTFS Alternate Data Stream (ADS). Files retain their classification provided that they are stored on an NTFS volume. If a file is moved to a FAT32 or ReFS volume, it loses its classification. One exception to this rule is Microsoft Office files; because classification metadata is stored in the files and the NTFS ADS, classification is not lost when files are moved to the cloud — think SharePoint.

We will explore all of this and then see how Dynamic Access Control (DAC) in Windows Server works with FCI to provide classification properties that are centralized in Active Directory (AD), rather than set locally on each file server.

30
April
12pm EDT
30 April, 12pm EDT
Register Now